Evidence discovered of woman “king” in ancient Canaan

Published on May 11th, 2009 | by Admin

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woman

Archaeologists have uncovered possible evidence that one of the rulers of Canaan, all previously believed to have been male, may have been a woman.

The plaque itself depicts a figure dressed as royal male figures and deities once appeared in Egyptian and Canaanite art. The figure’s hairstyle, though, is womanly and its bent arms are holding lotus flowers – attributes given to women. This plaque, art historians suggest, may be an artistic representation of the “Mistress of the Lionesses,” a female Canaanite ruler who was known to have sent distress letters to the Pharaoh in Egypt reporting unrest and destruction in her kingdom. 

“We took this finding to an art historian who confirmed our hypothesis that the figure was a female,” says Lederman. “Obviously something very different was happening in this city. We may have found the ‘Mistress of the Lionesses’ who’d been sending letters from Canaan to Egypt. The destruction we uncovered at the site last summer, along with the plaque, may just be the key to the puzzle.” 

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