The “Kelp Highway” Theory

Published on May 30th, 2009 | by Admin

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kelp

Anthropologists are hypothesizing that a rich marine route, known as the “kelp highway” may have led humans to settle the Pacific coast of the Americas some 15,000 years ago.

“I think as much as anything it was an exploratory urge,” he said at an international conference on the history of marine mammals at the University of B.C. “Populations were gradually growing and people kept moving. What’s around the next bend? If there were no people there, it must have been a really powerful draw to keep exploring.”

The kelp highway theory runs up against the long-held belief that the first humans entered the Americas on a land bridge that spanned the Bering Strait.

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