Tracing King Tut’s roots

Published on August 26th, 2009 | by Admin


Dr. Zahi Hawass, Secretary General of the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities, has published an essay discussing King Tut’s lineage and how DNA analysis cound help settle some unanswered questions.

In an attempt to unravel the mystery surrounding King Tut’s family and discover the identity of his father, we find that there are some archeologists who strongly suggest that this is most probably King Akhenaton. Akhenaton was the first Pharaoh to advocate monotheism, not just in ancient Egypt, but in the world. Others believe that Akhenaton’s father, King Amenhotep III is a more likely candidate for Tutankhamen’s father.

What about King Tut’s mother? If we follow the speculation mentioned above with regards to Tutankhamen’s father, his mother is most likely either Queen Tiye, the consort of King Amenhotep III or the extremely famous, Queen Nefertiti, the consort of King Akhenaton. However there are other experts who believe that Queen Kiya, who was a secondary consort of King Amenhotep III before joining Akhenaton’s harem, is the most likely candidate to be King Tut’s mother.

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One Response to Tracing King Tut’s roots

  1. Akhenaton and Nefertiti had 6 daughters. I’ve never read anything that suggest Nerfertiti was his mother, rather that Kiya was his mother. Tiye was his grandmother according to what I’ve read.
    Recently, I attended this lecture:
    KING TUT 101
    Albert Leonard, Jr.
    Professor Emeritus
    The University of Arizona

    And attended the on-going exhibit in San Francisco, where a ‘family tree’ is on display. Apparently, DNA testing is being done to clear up some questions.

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