Oldest ‘human’ skeleton found – eradicates ‘missing link’ theory

Published on October 2nd, 2009 | by Admin


Yesterday, scientists announced the discovery of Ardipithecus ramidus, affectionately known as Ardi, a 4.4 million-year-old skeleton that is being hailed as the oldest ‘human’ ancestor.

Older hominid fossils have been uncovered, including a skull from Chad at least six million years old and some more fragmentary, slightly younger remains from Kenya and nearby in the Middle Awash. While important, however, none of those earlier fossils are nearly as revealing as the newly announced remains, which in addition to Ardi’s partial skeleton include bones representing at least 36 other individuals.

“All of a sudden you’ve got fingers and toes and arms and legs and heads and teeth,” said Tim White of the University of California, Berkeley, who co-directed the work with Berhane Asfaw, a paleoanthropologist and former director of the National Museum of Ethiopia, and Giday WoldeGabriel, a geologist at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico.

“That allows you to do something you can’t do with isolated specimens,” White said. “It allows you to do biology.”

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