The search for the tomb of Genghis Khan

Published on November 10th, 2009 | by Admin


The search for the tomb of Genghis Khan continues in Mongolia.

According to legend, when Genghis Khan died in 1227 in what is now northern China, his lieutenants wanted to keep the death a secret from the Mongols’ enemies. So as the party accompanying his body made its way back to Mongolia, they killed every person they saw on the way – more than 20,000 – so news of the death wouldn’t spread. Then, when they buried Genghis, they either redirected a river to cover the site, or set horses to trample the ground so no trace would be seen, or killed all the people who buried him, and then killed those killers.

There is no hard evidence that any of those things happened. It may well be that they are after-the-fact embellishments designed to explain a remarkable circumstance of history: the location of Genghis’ tomb remains a mystery.

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19 Responses to The search for the tomb of Genghis Khan

  1. Chloe says:

    so this makes no sense because they say there is no real evidence to if it actually happened or not.

  2. Karla says:

    So they don’t actually have any hard evidence. But he did die. And they don’t know where was actually was buried.

  3. Chloe says:

    this doesnt make any sense because if they have no hard evidence then there is no actual proof that it actually happened.

  4. Saul says:

    This is a very mysterious article, yet….very brutal from the all the mass murder, which probably never happened. With their being no actual hard evidence, the article is a bit unreliable.

  5. Caleb Skrivanek says:

    The way they either redirected the river or ran horses over the burial site was very clever. The way they kept his death a secret by killing the people that buried him and then killed the people who killed him was very interesting.

  6. Andrew Nicolaysen says:

    The way that the Mongols kept Khan’s death a secret is very interesting because of the fact that they redirected rivers and had horses trample his burial site. But the fact that they killed so many people to keep his death a secret is a little extreme.

  7. Maile Deutsch says:

    Why did they want to keep Khan’s death a secret? Why would they not just want to let the Mongols know that Khan died? If Khan was such an important, powerful, well respected person whom many people admired, then why wouldn’t they want anybody to know that Khan had died? Because their was no hard evidence as to how Khan died, how would people know for sure that Khan had died during this time period? This could have been all just a set up or conspiracy against the Mongols to cause a major massacre of a dramatic population decrease, due to the killings of many innocent people who did not deserve to die. Why did Khan’s lieutenants go through so much trouble to hide every detail about Khan’s death and where his final resting place is? Was this to protect them from what might happen if people found out the truth behind his death? Will we ever know where Khan’s tomb is located and the substantial reason for his death?

  8. Matthew says:

    For some reason they wanted to keep his death a secret, but for what reason? Why would they kill so many people to keep one death a secret. If they did use horses to trample the ground or redirect a river it was very smart of them.

  9. Daisy Garcia says:

    This article is very unclear because there is no real evidence. They also very unclear as to if his burial site was trampled over by horses or redirected by the river. Leading to more questions rather than answering them altogether. Another mysterious part of the article is how they killed everyone they saw and those killers were also killed but if they didn’t want anyone to know then they would have continued this cycle without end.

  10. Samantha Hibbs says:

    This article is unclear and possible biased because how truthful could this theory actually be since they are unsure of where potential evidence could lie. It all seems a little fictitious because if Khan was so admired and well known, why keep the fact that he had passed,a secret? Instead of worrying about possible wars in response to the death of their leader, there could have also been the possibility of the citizens just mourning his loss.

  11. Samantha Maksud says:

    I understand wanting to keep this military leader death a secret, but killing everyone they came across seems a bit to hash. Though keeping the secret at the time was of the utmost importance to them. Reading this article the extremities they went through sound a bit nonsensical. Why would they redirect a river? Or even trample horses to cover their tracks. Finally none of this has ever been confirmed, nor has evidence ever been presented. So the theory cannot be considered true and all of this could be just to make out how extraordinary his burial was.

  12. Samantha Hibbs says:

    This article is very unclear and possible biased because the facts presented are quite possibly untruthful and misleading. Also, a ruler like Khan, who was so popular and strongly admired, would have been noticed had he been missing. Why would these followers/soldiers not allow his people to know of his death? Instead of worrying of the possible outcomes of war between the people due to the death of their ruler, they should’ve taken the fact of the citizens mourning the loss into consideration.

  13. Bethany says:

    This is a clever way to cover up a death but there is no actual evidence that this happened; they said that this is just “a legend”. This makes me think that they had to have at least SOME evidence that this happened, but we will never be sure unless his tomb is discovered to obtain answers.

  14. Ashley Slovacek says:

    For a certain reason his death was kept a secret and no one knows exactly why this was. His tomb burial site is not known and the only idea anyone has as to why we don’t know is because horses trampled over his tomb and the people that saw the casket along the way were killed then the people who buried him were killed by the delivers of the message that he was indeed buried were killed leaving no one with any idea of where he was buried. I don’t agree with this post because it cannot be proven that that actually happened.

  15. Alyssa Noel says:

    This is a very peculiar article due to the fact they did not want the death of Genghis Khan known. How they killed over 20,000 people seems like a lot of trouble to go through just to hide one death. Since there is no hard evidence of this occurring and whoever knew about it was supposedly killed, how could we know about it today? But considering the fact that his tomb is still a mystery makes this article seem a bit more true. And if it is true, they way they hid his body was very clever.

  16. Victoria says:

    It makes sense yet at the same time it doesn’t. It makes sense that they killed anybody they saw in order to make sure that the news of the death of Genghis Khan didn’t spread although it was quite brutal. What doesn’t make sense is the reason of why they didn’t want the news of Khan’s death to spread and why they discuss his burial and what the Mongols did in order to hide his death even though there isn’t no reliable evidence that proves that they did those things.

  17. Andrea Montano says:

    Since no one has real evidence on Genghis and his burial site we couldn’t possibly know this article is true. From this article and what we think is true on his burial site and the travels his people went through, make me very irksome. It makes me weirded out that they just killed all those people just to keep his death a secret.

  18. Marissa Feller says:

    I see where the Mongols are coming from in trying to hide Genghis Khan’s death from their enemies, but killing 20,000 innocent people is just a little excessive. Then after burying him, they killed the ones who buried him and then killed the men who killed them. This is a little absurd. I’m not positive if this could be true since there is no true evidence. It’s possible that this legend is a little biased since it’s so gruesome and people often thought of the mongols as “monsters”.

  19. Kayla says:

    The chances of this being true is very unlikely, due to the fact that there is no true evidence. If this is true is would be incredible, they were willing to kill all of those people just to hide the death of one person. This proves how powerful Genghis Khan really was. If they were scared of getting attacked by others, that would mean others were not scared of the mongols.They were only scared of Genghis Khan.

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