First ever East Asian skeleton found in Roman cemetery

Published on January 28th, 2010 | by Admin

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The remains of an East Asian man, the first ever discovered, has been found in a Roman cemetery in Vagnari, Italy.

The surprise is that the DNA tests show that one of the skeletons, a man, has an East Asian ancestry – on his mother’s side. This appears to be the first time that a skeleton with an East Asian ancestry has been discovered in the Roman Empire.

However, it seems like this contact between east and west did not go well.

Vagnari was an imperial estate during this time. The emperor controlled it and at least some of the workers were slaves. One of the tiles found at Vagnari is marked “Gratus” which means “slave” of the emperor. The workers produced iron implements and textiles. The landscape around them was nearly treeless, making the Italian summer weather all the worse.

The man with East Asian ancestry may well have been a slave himself. He lived sometime in the first to second century AD, in the early days of the Roman Empire. Much of his skeleton (pictured here) has not survived. The man’s surviving grave goods consist of a single pot (which archaeologists used to date the burial). To top things off someone was buried on top of him – with a superior collection of grave goods.

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3 Responses to First ever East Asian skeleton found in Roman cemetery

  1. Jim H says:

    Excellent story and website. Very similar to mine in fact. I just wrote an article on the lost Roman legion in China. Please take a look at http://historicmysteries.com , as I’ll be browsing through your great site as well!

    Jim

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