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Mary Rose crew member’s face recreated

The face of a crew member from the Mary Rose has been created by forensic artists working off of his skull.
Archaeologists believe the man was a Bosun because he was found with the emblem of this comparatively senior status, a Bosun’s call – a whistle.
There are many theories about why the ship sank, but evidence from the wreck itself suggests the ship put about with its gunports open, was hit by a squall and went down.
Ensuring that the gunports were closed would have been the Bosun’s job, which has led researchers to suggest that this man was “at least partly responsible for the disaster”.
The Mary Rose settled deep into the silty bed of the Solent, which preserved the many thousands of unique artefacts in excellent condition.
The wreck was discovered in the 1960s and in 1982 it was raised to the surface to be restored in dry dock in Portsmouth.
John Lippiett, chief executive of the trust, said: “It is great to have the opportunity to see what the Bosun looked like after all these years and to welcome his arrival in our museum.”
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The face of a crew member from the Mary Rose has been created by forensic artists working off of his skull.

Archaeologists believe the man was a Bosun because he was found with the emblem of this comparatively senior status, a Bosun’s call – a whistle.

There are many theories about why the ship sank, but evidence from the wreck itself suggests the ship put about with its gunports open, was hit by a squall and went down.

Ensuring that the gunports were closed would have been the Bosun’s job, which has led researchers to suggest that this man was “at least partly responsible for the disaster”.

The Mary Rose settled deep into the silty bed of the Solent, which preserved the many thousands of unique artefacts in excellent condition.

The wreck was discovered in the 1960s and in 1982 it was raised to the surface to be restored in dry dock in Portsmouth.

John Lippiett, chief executive of the trust, said: “It is great to have the opportunity to see what the Bosun looked like after all these years and to welcome his arrival in our museum.”

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