Medieval child’s brain found preserved

Published on March 15th, 2010 | by Admin

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brain

The brain of a child who lived in the 13th century has been found preserved, complete with neurons and cerebral cells.

An international team of researchers has identified intact neurons and cerebral cells in a mummified medieval brain, according to a study published in the journal Neuroimage.

Found inside the skull of a 13th century A.D. 18-month-old child from northwestern France, the brain had been fixed in formalin solution since its discovery in 1998.

“Although reduced by about 80 percent of its original weight, it has retained its anatomical characteristics and most of all, to a certain degree its cell structures,” anatomist and palaeopathologist Frank Ruhli, head of the Swiss Mummy Project at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, told Discovery News.

The brain was the only tissue preserved in the infant’s skeletonized body.

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