A look at the mysterious Pictish language of Scotland

Published on August 11th, 2010 | by Admin

2
pcit

The mystery surrounding the ancient Pictish language is deepening as linguits examine the Pict stones in Scotland.

They used a mathematical method to quantify patterns contained within the symbols, in an effort to find out if they conveyed meaning.

Professor Lee described the basis of this method.

“If I told you the first letter of a word in English was ‘Q’ and asked you to predict the next letter, you would probably say ‘U’ and you would probably be right,” he explained.

“But if I told you the first letter was ‘T’ you would probably take many more guesses to get it right – that’s a measure of uncertainty.”

Using the symbols, or characters, from the stones, Prof Lee and his colleagues measured this feature of so-called “character to character uncertainty”.

They concluded that the Pictish carvings were “symbolic markings that communicated information” – that these were words rather than pictures.

[Full story]

Tags: , , , , ,



2 Responses to A look at the mysterious Pictish language of Scotland

  1. Zix says:

    The signs on the left hand side above the drawings of human figures seem to represent what the Pictish believe about a human body (in this case a female).
    The right part of the body they believed, is of man, therefore the sign of three falling from a single circle (also quite akin to a man’s sexual organ). Man is mortal, when man side dies, it goes back to the source, circle. The other side is the female side, that they believed has reached the zenith of evolutionary pyramid and gained immortality. As the body orgasms in sex, the female side falls, and the male side rises from its fall. they meet halfway.
    You must also know that I smoke a lot of pot. Thank you, my dearest.
    Chop-chop!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • Follow me on Twitter!   Subscribe to my RSS feed!
     
  • Question of the Moment

    History in the making. November 8, 2016.

    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...
  • Like us on Facebook

  • Art Artifacts Bones Burials China Construction Egypt Egyptians England Food & Drink Fossils Humans Italy Medieval Remains Romans Scotland Shipwrecks Technology Tombs Turkey Underwater WWII
  • Archives