Olives were dietary staple of 2,300-year-old ship’s crew

Published on August 16th, 2010 | by Admin


Hundreds of olive pits have been found in a 2,300-year-old shipwreck in Cyprus.

Stella Demesticha of the University of Cyprus said Thursday that hundreds of olive pits found at the wreck indicate the fruit was a likely a staple of the crew’s diet at a time when sailors mostly were limited to dried foods.

The vessel’s sand-buried hull was found in 2007 at a depth of 45 metres (150 feet) just off the southern coastal village of Mazotos.
It was carrying hundreds of wine amphorae — or large terra-cotta vases — from Chios and other Aegean Sea islands.

Demesticha said lead rods forming part of an anchor also were found where the ship’s bow is thought to be.

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