Roman cemetery found in Kent, England

Published on September 21st, 2010 | by Admin

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faversham

A late Roman burial ground has been unearthed outside of Faversham, England.

Several different floors have been found, made from flint cobbles and compacted chalk, as well as 1st, 2nd and 3rd century ditches.

In Roman times this site, which was just outside the Roman town of Durolevum, contained a cemetery with cremation burials, as well as shops and industry.

Dr Wilkinson said: “Field survey and geophysical investigation, supported by limited excavation by the field school, has shed new light on the nature and extent of monuments within the park, which in turn has led to a wider investigation of the land north and south of the Roman Watling Street which runs east/west through the park.”

Dr Wilkinson added that some of the early ditches on the site could possibly date from the Roman invasion of England in AD43 but much work was still needed before archaeologists could be certain about this.

Many of the coin finds date from the 4th century but a large Roman ditch has been dated by coins and pottery to the early 1st century AD.

“We have also found a Roman kiln or oven, Roman cremation burials and Roman Watling Street as the study site lies within a rich archaeological landscape,” Dr Wilkinson added.

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