Protestors call for covering of ancient remains

Published on October 25th, 2010 | by Admin

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British museums have been closing coffins and covering ancient mummies to placate offended protesters.

Small groups such as the Pagan Organisation Honouring the Ancient Dead claim that it is against the religious beliefs of our ancestors to put bodies on show.

Museums are becoming increasingly nervous about displaying human remains. Seventeen have drawn up guidelines advising curators to warn the public and only display photographs of mummies with a shroud.

The Egypt gallery at Bristol City Museum & Art Gallery now has half-closed coffin lids on its display of mummies. Manchester University Museum covered up an unwrapped mummy and removed the head of an Iron Age bog body. The Museum of London removed the skeleton of a boy with rickets.

In a new book Dr Tiffany Jenkins, of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), pointed out that mummies, skeletons and skulls are often the most popular display in museums.

Dr Jenkins feared that the guidance will mean that eventually there will be no human remains on display at all for fear of offending.

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2 Responses to Protestors call for covering of ancient remains

  1. Les Heasman says:

    Perhaps we who are Pagans should realise that the very reason we can rebuild our religions is because of the work of archaeologists and part of that work is to display the results to the public. This is after all, how they obtain funding for retrieving information from the historical record. No show, no pay, no info to help rebuild that which was lost due to Christianity eradicating the older native religions. For the record I’m not anti-christian either.

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