Roman temple to Diana found in Tuscany

Published on November 16th, 2010 | by Admin

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diana

A Roman temple dedicated to the goddess Diana has been unearthed in the Italian region of Tuscany.

The ancient religious sanctuary, found in the Maremma national park is 350 square metres large, and was discovered in perfect condition by a team of Italian and other European archaeologists following a two-year dig.

Traditionally, Diana is known as the ‘virgin’ goddess charged with protecting women. According to mythology, Diana, along with goddesses Minerva and Vesta, swore to never marry, but the goddess is also associated with wild animals and nature, and so bears a second title of ‘Diana, goddess of the hunt.’

The temple, which has some seven internal rooms, also contained several items that were unearthed during the dig including 35 oil lamps, 10 coins, a bronze dog-shaped votive, two glass vials and mosaic decorations. Three statues of Diana and her twin brother, Apollo, were also uncovered.

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3 Responses to Roman temple to Diana found in Tuscany

  1. Peter J. Nebergall says:

    Need location of site? Further website so archaeology professionals and university instructors (like me) can send our students to read it. Story too short!

  2. Dear all,
    thanks for publishing our discovery of the sanctuary and temple of Diana Umbronensis in Tuscany, Italy. For any further info you can access our website http://www.progettoalberese.it or join our Facebook group “Progetto Archeologico Alberese – Alberese Archaeological Project”. In few days the website will be updated with the new monument together with the Roman cabotage port of Roselle that we found out in June 2010.

    All the best wishes

    Alessandro Sebastiani

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