Roman soldier’s bathhouse found in Jerusalem

Published on November 22nd, 2010 | by Admin

2
baths

An 1,800-year-old Roman bathhouse, used by soldiers, has been found in Jerusalem.

“The mark of the soldiers of the Tenth Legion, in the form of the stamped impressions on the roof tiles and the in situ mud bricks, bears witness to the fact that they were the builders of the structure,” he said.

“It seems that the bathhouse was used by these soldiers who were garrisoned there after suppressing the Bar Kokhba uprising in 135 CE (A.D.), when the pagan city Aelia Capitolina was established,” he explained.

The structure includes a number of plastered bathtubs in the side of a pool, a pipe used to fill it with water, and a white industrial mosaic pavement on the floor.

Hundreds of terra cotta roof tiles were found on the floors of the pool, indicating it was a covered structure, he added.

The bathhouse tiles are stamped with the symbols of the Tenth Legion “Fretensis” — LEG X FR, he said.

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2 Responses to Roman soldier’s bathhouse found in Jerusalem

  1. The Romans built things that last! It’s fascinating to find Roman baths and plumbing still working after all this time. perhaps today’s engineers and companies can take note of the quality. Thanks for the post!

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