“Chinese Pompeii” unearthed in central China

Published on December 17th, 2010 | by Admin

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china

A 2,000-year-old village dating back to the Han Dynasty has been unearthed in central China.

The site consists of four walled houses—each the residence of an extended family—surrounded by wells, toilets, ponds, and trees.

In July, archaeologist Tristram Kidder of Washington University in St. Louis and his Chinese colleagues discovered evidence of even older agricultural fields beneath the excavated houses and a larger buried town about two miles away. “If these are preserved in the same way the houses are, it would really turn out to be a staggering development,” Kidder says.

The 2003 find was buried intact by 28 inches of flood sediments, which formed a protective layer over the village. Kidder thinks a massive late-summer flood of the Yellow River hit so quickly that people left behind everything, from large grinding stones to tiny coins. In addition, impressions of mulberry leaves, considered a sign of silkworm production, were found, indicating that Sanyangzhuang was one of the places where the Silk Road began.

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