Rock shelters damaged by construction work

Published on January 19th, 2011 | by Admin


Ancient rock shelters, many dating back to the Stone Age, are being damaged by unregulated construction in Pakistan.

A ‘rock shelter’ (also known as rock house, crepuscular cave or ‘abri’) is a shallow cave-like opening at the base of a bluff or cliff. ‘Rock shelters’ form because a rock stratum such as sandstone, which is resistant to erosion and weathering, has formed a cliff or bluff, but a softer stratum, more subject to erosion and weathering, lies just below the resistant stratum, and thus undercuts the cliff.

‘Rock shelters’ are often important archaeologically. Because ‘rock shelters’ form natural shelters from the weather, prehistoric humans often used them as living-places, and left behind debris, tools and other artefacts.

According to archaeologists, one of the oldest rock shelters dating back to the Stone Age is situated in Sector G-13, which has unfortunately become a victim of development work. A portion of it has been badly damaged as developers are unaware of its significance and the city authorities are least concerned about the preservation of such ancient sites.

[Full Story]

Story: The International News | Photo: The International News

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