Tobacco found in Maya container

Published on January 12th, 2012 | by Admin

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Archaeologists have found traces of nicotine inside a 1,300-year-old Mayan vessel.

The approximately two-and-a-half-inch wide and high clay vessel bears Mayan hieroglyphics, reading “the home of his/her tobacco.” The vessel, part of the large Kislak Collection housed at the Library of Congress, was made around 700 A.D. in the region of the Mirador Basin, in Southern Campeche, Mexico, during the Classic Mayan period. Tobacco use has long been associated with the Mayans, thanks to previously deciphered hieroglyphics and illustrations showing smoking gods and people, but physical evidence of the activity is exceptionally limited, according to the researchers.

[Full story]

Story: Newswise | Photo: Library of Congress

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