Neanderthals were on verge of extinction when humans arrived

Published on March 1st, 2012 | by Sevaan Franks

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neanderthal

A new mitochondrial DNA study suggests that Neanderthals were on the verge of extinction in western Europe when modern humans arrived on the scene, only to recover in certains areas before eventually vanishing after another 10,000 years.

The fossil specimens came from Europe and Asia and span a time period ranging from 100,000 years ago to about 35,000 years ago.

The scientists found that west European fossils with ages older than 48,000 years, along with Neanderthal specimens from Asia, showed considerable genetic variation.

But specimens from western Europe younger than 48,000 years showed much less genetic diversity (variation in the older remains and the Asian Neanderthals was six-fold greater than in the western examples).

In their scientific paper, the scientists propose that some event – possibly changes in the climate – caused Neanderthal populations in the West to crash around 50,000 years ago. But populations may have survived in warmer southern refuges, allowing the later re-expansion.

[Full story]

Story: Paul Rincon, BBC News | Photo: SPL

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