18th-century stone wall uncovered in Manhattan

Published on March 15th, 2012 | by Admin


Workers digging beneath Fulton Street in Lower Manhattan have uncovered a stone wall which dates back to the 18th century.

The 6-foot-long wall, found seven feet under the ground in front of 40 Fulton St., was likely part of an 18th-century building that may have belonged to the Van Cortlandts or the Van Tienhovens, two influential early New York families who both owned property in the area, according to Alyssa Loorya, the archaeologist who is documenting the find.

The wall was later buried in landfill when Fulton Street was extended toward the East River.

[Full story]

Story: Julie Shapiro, DNAInfo | Photo: Chrysalis Archaeology

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