Rare wooden pharaoh statue found

Published on March 15th, 2012 | by Admin


Archaeologists working in the south of Egypt have unearthed a rare wooden statue of a pharoah which may represent the female king Hatshepsut.

The pharaonic figure is not obviously a female, said Pouls Wegner, but is notable for its “smaller waist” and the “more delicate modelling of the chin.”

These attributes were typically reserved for female subjects in Egyptian art. And because Hatshepsut was traditionally depicted in the manner of a male pharaoh, such subtle clues are often used by experts to confirm her identity in stone statues and other imagery, she said.

But relatively few depictions of Hatshepsut have survived because of a concerted effort by her stepson and immediate successor — Tuthmosis III — to erase all prominent images of the female ruler. Many experts believe the campaign of destruction was carried out so Tuthmosis could claim credit for Hatshepsut’s achievements and suppress challenges towards the legitimacy of his own rule.

[Full story]

Story: Randy Boswell, Postmedia News | Photo: Mary-Ann Pouls Wegner

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