Dental plaque used to examine ancient diets

Published on May 9th, 2012 | by Sevaan Franks

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Anthropologists are now examining ancient dental plaque to examine the diets of ancient people.

Scott obtained samples of dental calculus from 58 skeletons buried in the Cathedral of Santa Maria in northern Spain dating from the 11th to 19th centuries to conduct research on the diet of this ancient population. After his first methodology met with mixed results, he decided to send five samples of dental calculus to Poulson at the University‘s Stable Isotope Lab, in the off chance they might contain enough carbon and nitrogen to allow them to estimate stable isotope ratios.

“It’s chemistry and is pretty complex,” Scott explained. “But basically, since only protein has nitrogen, the more nitrogen that is present, the more animal products were consumed as part of the diet. Carbon provides information on the types of plants consumed.”

[Full story]

Story: Science Daily | Photo: G. Richard Scott, University of Nevada

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