1,600-year-old Roman curses translated

Published on May 24th, 2012 | by Admin

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curse

Two ancient curses inscribed on lead tablets have been translated, revealing their intended victims: a senator named Fistus and a veterinarian named Porcello.

Sánchez Natalías added that it isn’t certain who cursed Porcello or why. It could be for either personal or professional reasons. “Maybe this person was someone that (had) a horse or an animal killed by Porcello’s medicine,” said Sánchez Natalías.

“Destroy, crush, kill, strangle Porcello and wife Maurilla. Their soul, heart, buttocks, liver …” part of it reads. The iconography on the tablet actually shows a mummified Porcello, his arms crossed (as is the deity) and his name written on both of his arms.

[Full story]

Story: Owen Jarus, LiveScience | Photo: Museo Archeologico Civico di Bologna

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