The oldest olive pit in Britain

Published on July 23rd, 2012 | by Admin


A charred olive pit which dates back to the 1st century B.C. has been found in a well in Hampshire, England.

Iron Age Britons were importing olives from the Mediterranean a century before the Romans arrived with their exotic tastes in food, say archaeologists who have discovered a single olive stone from an excavation of an Iron Age well at at Silchester in Hampshire.

The stone came from a layer securely dated to the first century BC, making it the earliest ever found in Britain – but since nobody ever went to the trouble of importing one olive, there must be more, rotted beyond recognition or still buried.

The stone, combined with earlier finds of seasoning herbs such as coriander, dill and celery, all previously believed to have arrived with the Romans, suggests a diet at Silchester that would be familiar in any high street pizza restaurant.

[Full story]

Story: Maev Kennedy, The Guardian | Photo: Graham Turner, The Guardian

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