First-ever Roman roof reconstruction completed at Herculaneum

Published on August 1st, 2012 | by Admin


The roof of a Roman villa, thought to have belonged to a wealthy governor, has been reconstructed at the ancient city of Herculaneum.

For almost two millennia, the piles of wood lay undisturbed and largely intact under layers of hardened volcanic material. Now, after three years of painstaking work, archaeologists at Herculaneum have not only excavated and preserved the pieces, but worked out how they fitted together, achieving the first-ever full reconstruction of the timberwork of a Roman roof.

With several dozen rooms, the House of the Telephus Relief was “top-level Roman real estate”, said Andrew Wallace-Hadrill, the director of the Herculaneum Conservation Project (HCP). It was more of a palace or mansion, thought to have been built for Marcus Nonius Balbus, the Roman governor of Crete and part of modern-day Libya, whose ostentatious tomb was found nearby.

[Full story]

Story: John Hooper, The Guardian | Photo: Art Archive/Alamy

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