Archaic human genome mapped

Published on September 6th, 2012 | by Admin

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Scientists have sequenced the genome of of the Denisovans, a human ancestor, using a tiny finger bone, the only fossil record of the people, found in a cave in Siberia.

The sequencing is so complete that researchers have as sharp a picture of this ancient genome as they would of a living person’s, revealing, for example that the girl had brown eyes, hair, and skin. “No one thought we would have an archaic human genome of such quality,” says Matthias Meyer, a postdoc at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. “Everyone was shocked by the counts. That includes me.”

That precision allows the team to compare the nuclear genome of this girl, who lived in Siberia’s Denisova Cave more than 50,000 years ago, directly to the genomes of living people, producing a “near-complete” catalog of the small number of genetic changes that make us different from the Denisovans, who were close relatives of Neandertals. “This is the genetic recipe for being a modern human,” says team leader Svante Pääbo, a paleogeneticist at the institute.

[Full story]

Story: Ann Gibbons, Science Magazine | Photo: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

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