Study reveals obsidian trade routes

Published on September 7th, 2012 | by Admin


A new study performed by an archaeologist from the University of Sheffield has revealed the ancient routes used to trade obsidian in Syria 4,200 years ago.

Most of the obsidian at Tell Mozan (and surrounding archaeological sites) originated from volcanoes 200km away in what is now eastern Turkey, as expected from models of ancient trade developed by archaeologists over the last five decades. However, the team discovered a set of exotic obsidian artefacts originating from a volcano in central Turkey, three times farther away. Just as important as their distant origin is where the artefacts were found: a royal palace courtyard. The artefacts were left there during the height of the world’s first empire, the Akkadian Empire, which invaded Syria in the Bronze Age. The find has exciting implications for understanding links between resources and empires in the Middle East.

[Full story]

Story: University of Sheffield | Photo: Wikimedia Commons

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