Prehistoric gender roles reexamined after grave find

Published on October 16th, 2012 | by Admin


A Bronze Age grave containing metal-working tools has been found to have belonged to a woman, surprising researchers who previously believed metalwork was a job carried out exclusively by men.

The Museum of Ancient History in Lower Austria says the grave originates from the Bronze Age around 2,000 years before the birth of Christ, and that the bones belonged to a woman who would have been aged between 45 and 60.

The museum says tools used to make metal ornaments were also found in the grave at Geitzendorf Northwest of Vienna, leading to the conclusion that it was that of a female fine metal worker who had been given the items to take with her into the afterlife.

[Full story]

Story: Austrian Independent | Photo: Europics

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