Anglo-Saxon feasting hall uncovered beneath village green

Published on November 1st, 2012 | by Admin


A 1,300-year-old Anglo-Saxon feasting hall has been uncovered inches beneath the village green at Lyminge in Kent, England.

At 69 feet by 28 feet, the hall would have been an impressive structure with room for at least 60 people.

Animals bones which were found buried in pits near the edge of the hall signal the many extravagant feasts held at the biggest hall for miles around, before it was abandoned and later destroyed.

A piece of gilded horse harness was also found among the foundations which has helped archaeologists date the site to the late sixth or early seventh century.

[Full story]

Story: Alex Ward, The Daily Mail | Photo: University of Reading

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