Battle of Hastings site actually one mile north of official site

Published on November 1st, 2012 | by Admin

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In 1066 10,000 men were killed at the Battle of Hastings, but no remains have been found at the supposed battle site. Some historians now believe the actual battle took place one mile north of the “official site”.

He has studied contemporaneous documents in the national archives and built up a dossier of circumstantial evidence that, when put together, make a more than convincing argument in his favour.

Witness accounts from 1066 state the battle was fought on steep and unploughed terrain, consistent with Caldbec Hill. Senlac Hill was cultivated and had gentle slopes.

The Normans erected a cairn of stones on the battle site to commemorate their victory, known as a Mount-joie in French. The summit of Caldbec Hill is still today called Mountjoy.

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Story: The Telegraph | Photo: BNPS

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