Mediterranean settlers ate little seafood

Published on December 4th, 2012 | by Admin

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An analysis of 20,000-year-old remains found in a cave on the island of Favignana in the Mediterranean has revealed that the first people to the area did not eat much of the bountiful seafood found in the are.

“The source of the dietary protein consumed mainly originated from the meat of medium to large terrestrial herbivores,” said the report’s first author, Marcello Mannino, an archaeologist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany.

The remains were found in a cave on the small island of Favignana, which thousands of years ago was part of Sicily. Sicily itself was connected to the mainland by a land bridge, allowing humans to cross over.

[Full story]

Story: Sindya N. Bhanoo | Photo: Chris Gash

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