Reconstructed Egyptian temple to be reopened at Karnak

Published on February 12th, 2013 | by Admin

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temple

The limestone chapel of queen Hatshepsut will be opened after four years of restoration and construction.

The chapel was constructed in limestone to worship Thebes ancient Egyptian god Amun-Re. It includes an open court and two inner halls embellished with blocks engraved with very distinguished religious scenes depicting Hatshepsut before Amun-Re, with her husband king Thutmose II, as well as their cartouches. Some of the blocks bear the name of Hatshepsut’s predecessor king Thutmose III.

Minister of State for Antiquities Mohamed Ibrahim said that the majority of blocks of this chapel were found scattered at the beginning of the 20th century in the Karnak courtyard cachette where a collection of gigantic colossi of different New Kingdom kings, queens, nobles and top officials as well as deities were discovered. Another batch of the blocks, Ibrahim added, was found in mid 1950’s during excavation works carried out by Sheata Adam and Farid El-Shaboury at the cachette.

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Story: Nevine El-Aref, Ahram | Photo: CFEETK

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3 Responses to Reconstructed Egyptian temple to be reopened at Karnak

  1. Jane Gray says:

    You misspelled “reconstructed” in the title.

  2. In ancient Egypt, the power of the god Amun of Thebes gradually increased during the early New Kingdom, and after the short persecution led by Akhenaten program, it peaked. Under the reign of Ramses III, more than two thirds of the property belonging to the temples belonged to Amun, evidenced by the splendid buildings of Karnak. Although badly ruined, no site in Egypt is more impressive than Karnak.

  3. In ancient Egypt, the power of the god Amun of Thebes gradually increased during the early New Kingdom, and after the short persecution led by Akhenaten program, it peaked. Under the reign of Ramses III, more than two thirds of the property belonging to the temples belonged to Amun, evidenced by the splendid buildings of Karnak. Although badly ruined, no site in Egypt is more impressive than Karnak. It is the largest temple complex ever built by man, and represents the combined achievement of many generations of ancient builders. The Temple of Karnak is actually three main temples, smaller enclosed temples, and several outer temples located about three kilometers north of Luxor, Egypt situated on 100 hectares (247 acres) of land. Karnak is actually the sites modern name. Its ancient name was Ipet-isut, which means “more Select (or sacred) places.”This vast complex was built and enlarged over a period of thirteen hundred years. The three main temples of Mut, Montu and Amun are enclosed by enormous brick walls. The open air museum is situated north of the first courtyard in front of the sacred lake. The main complex, the temple of Amun, is situated in the center of the entire complex. The Temple of Montu is north of the temple of Amun, and next door to the inside of the wall is the temple of Ptah, while the Temple of Mut is to the south. There is also a small temple dedicated to Khonsu, and next to it, an even smaller Opet temple. In fact, there are a number of smaller temples and chapels spread about Karnak, such as Osiris Hek-Djet temple (Heqadjet), which is actually inside the wall of the temple of Amun.The sacred lake of Karnak

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