Vikings were not the first to colonize the Faroe Islands

Published on September 4th, 2013 | by Admin

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New research has revealed that the Faroe Islands in the North Atlantic Island were inhabited at least 300-500 years earlier than previously believed.

The Faroes were the first stepping stone beyond Shetland for the dispersal of European people across the North Atlantic that culminated on the shores of continental North America in the 11th century AD, about 500 years before Columbus made his famous voyage.

The research was carried out on an archaeological site at Á Sondum on the island of Sandoy.

Analysis showed an extensive windblown sand deposit containing patches of burnt peat ash from human activity, dating human settlement to pre-Viking phases. These ash spreads contained barley grains which were accidentally burnt in domestic hearths and were then spread by humans onto the windblown sand surface during the 4th-6th centuries and 6th-8th centuries, a common practice identified in the North Atlantic during this period to control wind erosion.

[Full story]

Story: e! Science News | Photo: Wikimedia Commons

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