Bronze Age brain tissue found in Turkey

Published on October 18th, 2013 | by Admin



Brain tissue dating back 4,000 years has been found in Bronze Age skeletons uncovered in western Turkey.

It may look like nothing more than a bit of burnt log, but it is one of the oldest brains ever found. Its discovery, and the story now being pieced together of its owner’s last hours, offers the tantalising prospect that archaeological remains could harbour more ancient brain specimens than thought. If that’s the case, it potentially opens the way to studying the health of the brain in prehistoric times.

Brain tissue is rich in enzymes that cause cells to break down rapidly after death, but this process can be halted if conditions are right. For instance, brain tissue has been found in the perfectly preserved body of an Inca child sacrificed 500 years ago. In this case, death occurred at the top of an Andean mountain where the body swiftly froze, preserving the brain.

[Full story]

Story: Colin Barras, New Scientist | Photo: Halic University Instabul

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