Gallic tomb containing chariot found in northern France

Published on July 14th, 2014 | by Sevaan Franks

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inrap-1
inrap-1 Road construction in northern France has uncovered a Gallic wood-lined tomb that contains a chariot.

Starting on 3 June for a three week period, archaeologists and an anthropologist have been working to uncover this chariot tomb. This type of aristocratic tomb emerges in the 7th century B.C. – during the first Iron Age – and ends with the end of the Gallic period. The oldest chariots have four wheels (like that found at Vix), while those from the second Iron Age have only two. The deceased person – who could be male or female – was generally inhumed on the chariot, which was an object of prestige and a symbol of social status. Champagne-Ardenne is famous for such tombs (particularly at Bourcq and Semide in the Ardennes), which are generally dated to the start of the second Iron Age (5th-4th century B.C.).

[Full story] Story: Art Daily | Photo: Denis Gliksman, Inrap

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